(Digerati) Google’s China Problem

China –  Google blocked? “A scandalous accusation!”

The New New Thing – LinkedIn, Facebook offer alternatives to company website

Long Reads – “Push-Shove” – insights into China’s youth

China

Google’s China problem

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/bric-yard/googles-china-problem

Google mail users in China, particularly media and news specialists, have reported problems accessing the mail system in the last few weeks. After extensive checks, Google has found no technical reason on their side for the problems. Google has not beaten around the bush; the online giant issued a statement saying, “We’ve noticed some highly targeted and apparently politically motivated attacks against our users,” the company said on its official blog. “We believe activists may have been a specific target.”

China dismisses Google’s accusations

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/22/us-google-china-idUSTRE72K1VV20110322

After days of silence, China’s Foreign Ministry released a statement on accusations made by Google regarding the limiting of the giant’s Gmail service. “This is an unacceptable accusation,” Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu told a regular news conference, without elaborating.

So there must be another reason that Gmail is running 45 times slower than China’s Tencent QQ?

http://thenextweb.com/asia/2011/03/24/in-china-gmail-is-now-45-times-slower-than-tencent-qq

Greatfirewall.biz, a website that keeps track of websites and searches that are blocked in mainland China, has come out with a new report: that Gmail is now 45 times slower than QQ and 8 times slower than Yahoo when accessed in China.

China’s big four

http://mashable.com/2011/03/18/china-top-social-network/

China’s social media scene is different from anywhere else. Four homegrown networks are vying for the mass market. Renren, a faithful copy of Facebook, is China’s leader and is planning for an IPO soon. In addition to its nickname-based network (Qzone), internet giant Tencent is at long last awakening to real-name social with its new network, Pengyou. Finally, Kaixin001 is dying, stuck between the decline of its social games and rise of Sina Weibo (China’s Twitter). In addition to the top four, China also has a “long tail” of social networks that are more specialized — just for children, gamers or lovers. Here is a deeper look at those top four networks and what makes them tick.

The Social Web

LinkedIn: Make it top of mind for you and your clients

http://blog.ogilvypr.com/2011/03/linkedin-make-it-top-of-mind-for-you-your-clients/

In addition to reaching over 100 million people around the world, LinkedIn is adding more and more features that make it an excellent resource for agencies and clients. Company pages, student job portals, and a recommendation service are just a few of these.

(Thanks to Ogilvy 360 DI)

Is Facebook is killing off the company website?

http://www.jeffbullas.com/2011/03/21/is-facebook-killing-off-the-company-website/

Long Reads

The globalization of revolution

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/opinion/2011/03/2011320131934568573.html

While the West has emphasized the use of technology and social networking in recent uprisings, Al Jazeera strikes a different tone, chalking those views up to globalization, saying that, “The Internet was turned off at decisive moments in the Egyptian uprising, and it was ordinary Egyptians, mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, who toppled the regime, not the hybrid youth of the global professional classes.”

The Push Shove – a look into the evolving youth of Mainland China

http://www.thepushshove.com/the-push-shoves-china-outlook-full-version/

Check out this well-designed document, which gives insight into: youth culture beyond Shanghai and Beijing, the expanding underground music scene, 2011 as the year of action sports, and The Virtual – Actual Network.